Arco del Cabo San Lucas

Photo Apr 26, 8 18 09 PM

Cabo San Lucas is the Southernmost point on the Baja Peninsula. It’s essentially a desert, the only green you see around you are the cacti. It’s a short drive from the airport to the beach however, and once you get there you’re surrounded by the ocean on one side and the rocky cliffs on the other.

If you go past the resorts in Cabo and keep driving to the tip of the Baja Peninsula you find the famous Arc of Cabo. You actually can’t drive to it, but you can get there by boat or by hiking a steep, rocky cliff. The arc was naturally formed by weathering and erosion of the rock mass and is now a popular tourist spot and a perfect spot for pictures.

Just to the right of the large mass in the picture above is a small beach, Lover’s Beach. It’s very secluded and the only way to get there, I assume, is by boat. There was recently a Cosmopolitan article about this beach because it’s also one of the top spots in Cabo to see celebrities.

Swinging Above the City

#SaturdayMorningFunFacts

 

The first place I ever went in Europe was Amsterdam. When I left for my trip there were so many things I wanted to see, to do, and to try. And when I got there, there was so much more than I even realized.

I was only in Amsterdam for three and a half days – it was enough for a first trip to one city in the Netherlands. Even though I knew from previous experiences on previous trips that I would meet people along the way who would help double my itinerary – you don’t really know until it happens.

It was a bartender from Ireland in a small pub behind our hotel who told us about the A’DAM tower. She told us which tram to get on and how to take the free ferry across the canal to the building. She did not tell us how cold it was going to be once we got to the top though and my shorts were not good enough to keep me warm.

The whole building is an experience, so even if you’re afraid of heights it’s worth checking out. The ground floor is a gift shop and photo center, this is where we took the fun photo above – in front of a green screen obviously.

The elevator ride up is another highlight of this building. The elevator has a glass ceiling, and the top of the building and the elevator shaft is lined with lights. It’s some kind of light show that I couldn’t even begin to explain and you have to see for yourself.

You get off on the top floor of the building where the bar is located. It’s a bar/observation deck with 360 degree views. The views are also interactive, there are screens located in front of the window at various intervals and you can kind of ‘click’ on the spot you’re checking out to get more information on it.

Up the stairs to the roof, you’re now 100 meters above Amsterdam. It’s a wind tunnel and you’re freezing, but the views are amazing. It’s actually the second tallest building in Amsterdam, so you’re not at the tallest point but compared to the average height you can see over pretty much every building around. Also, being across one of the bigger canals on the outskirts of the city you can actually see the entire city spread out in front of you.

It’s not a basic swing that you’re on, it’s a carnival ride. The employee straps you in and the ride lifts you up even higher before you start swinging over the edge of the building. I even felt that distinct belly drop I remember as a kid when I went on rides at fiesta.

It’s not the tallest point in the world, or Europe, or even Amsterdam. But it’s the highest swing you’ll find in Europe and that’s pretty cool if you’re not afraid of heights. I wouldn’t say I am but the ride wasn’t short and I did get a little worried that the ride might fall apart and send me into the freezing canal below me.

Always Moving Forward

If I stay in one place for too long, things get repetitive. I fall in a routine and nothing is new anymore. If nothing is new, I yearn for those experience I haven’t gotten yet.

I fear that I am missing out on something new. Some new experience, some new place, some new people.

It’s like FOMO of the unknown if that makes any sense at all.

If I’m not moving I get anxious and I’m not pleased unless I have something new to look forward to.

A week ago I could have ripped my hair out of my head out of boredom of being in one place for almost two months. I had no plans for the near future and it was driving me crazy.

This week I have a Nashville trip planned for Labor Day Weekend and it’s actually comforting to know I have something to look forward to. Something to plan for.

novaturient

 

~I actually wrote this a couple weeks ago – it’s a #latergram for blog posts because I just found this image on Pinterest and it kind of summarizes everything I was trying to say~

How Do You Even Pronounce Vallarta?

As I was getting ready to write this post, I realized I’ve never actually written anything about Puerto Vallarta – on my blog or elsewhere – so here it is.

Right after I got back from my Europe trip in June I changed suitcases and went straight back to the airport to fly down to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico with my company.

This trip was part business and part pleasure; learning about the destinations I sell is part of the job but experiencing the nightclubs and excursions is part of it as well.

 

We spent five days trying every flavor margarita at the margarita bar at our resort, ziplining through the jungle, sailing the bay at sunset, strolling through town and eating at a mountainside restaurant with amazing views of the bay and the Iglesia De Guadalupe En Puerto Vallarta.

PV-12

This cathedral is an iconic part of Puerto Vallarta’s skyline. It’s iron crown towers over most of the other buildings in town and draws in tourists. The rumor I heard while I was in Puerto Vallarta was that the crown was designed after the crown worn by Empress Carlota of Mexico.

I looked this up to confirm the facts once I was back in the States and found this rumor to actually not be true. Empress Carlota of Mexico, based on her hierarchy within the nobility, would have worn a tiara, not a crown. The crown that tops the Iglesia De Guadalupe En Puerto Vallarta is actually just designed by priest Rafael Parra Castillo, the same person who designed the tower.

 

Isostatic Rebound and Other Science-y Stuff

image

Obviously because I started doing these Saturday morning posts on Instagram two weeks before I started sharing them on my blog, I’m a little behind but that’s okay.

This picture was taking at the start of Nahku Bay, located in between Skagway, Alaska and the former gold rush town of Dyea. Other than being full of history, it also contains my favorite view of the Lynn Canal and the glacial mountains surrounding it.

I spent three months during the Summer of 2016 in Skagway working, exploring, and learning about the history of the area. Our housing was actually located in Skagway, but our worksite was in Dyea.

Every morning we made the drive to Dyea, past this amazing view, heading to the Musher’s camp and zipline. The unpaved road twisted around the bay on the side of the mountains surrounding it – looking back, it was actually a scary cliffside ride in an area where rockslides were common.

What does all of this have to do with Isostatic Rebound? And what is isostatic rebound, anyway?

I’ll let Wikipedia define it for me :

“Post-glacial rebound (also called either isostatic rebound or crustal rebound) is the rise of land masses that were depressed by the huge weight of ice sheets during the last glacial period, through a process known as isostatic depression.”

Basically, the area of Nahku Bay was completely filled in with glacial ice hundreds of years ago causing the entire area to compress downwards. The movement and melting of the glacier is what carved out the bay and once it was gone, the land underneath was free from the pressure and able to decompress, or move upwards again.

The land here is still moving upwards. The constant but inconsistent change of landscape is why Dyea Road cannot be paved and also attributes to some of the rockslides in the area.

Based on the amount of time I spent here, and the vast amounts of history in this small town, I know I will be posting more fun facts about it soon.

Icelandic Horses

Two weeks ago I decided to share weekly photos on Instagram of places I’ve visited along with an interesting fact about the place. Fast forward to today, I figure this also makes for some fun, short, weekly blog posts.

So, let’s jump right into my fun fact from week number one.

This past June, I visited Iceland. It was a quick stopover on our way home from Amsterdam and the visit was rushed. We travelled along Ring Road as quickly as possible, hitting all the top tourist spots, sleeping in our rental car, and hiking a glacier before heading back to the States.

We also ran into this perfect roadside pasture and met a couple of the locals. These beautiful Icelandic horses were so friendly and let us walk right up and take a couple pictures with them. No, we didn’t feed them, don’t worry.

Icelandic horses are short, stubby, and fluffy, they almost resemble ponies. But every horse you see here looks similar, there really is no variation in the typical Icelandic horse characterization. This got us wondering, why?

Simple, it’s illegal to bring any type of horse into Iceland. You can bring an Icelandic horse out of the country, but once it’s removed it cannot come back in. This prevents any foreign diseases from entering the ecosystem.

I’m not an expert on horses, or genes, or most science-related information but, the conclusion I got from this was that without the introduction of other species the gene pool has stayed the same, limiting the variance of the Icelandic horse.

What you see is what you get and these horses are cute enough that I don’t think anyone would have it any other way.

Part 5: 36 Hours in the Land of Fire and Ice

The sun was setting over Amsterdam as we took off as a final farewell to that beautiful country.

Ironically, the sun was also beginning to set when we landed three hours later in Iceland. (at midnight.)

Thanks to my time in Alaska, the midnight sun is something I’m used to. On the other hand, counting by the number of times John woke me up after I fell asleep at our Air bnb, he was not used to the sunlight peaking through the cracks in our blackout curtains.

My control freak friend, gave me power over two decisions this entire trip: spending a day at a castle in the Netherlands, and spending a night in a tent in Iceland.

Of course with my luck, these are the two things that went wrong and he got to rub it in my face. First, the castle was closed the day we decided to go, and second, the store I had rented the camping equipment from opened at noon…. and we had planned on leaving Reykjavik at 9 a.m.

As it was, we only had about 30 hours to enjoy in Iceland to begin with, and we weren’t going to waste four waiting for a tent. New plan: spend the night in our rental car.

After a quick stop at the grocery store and Dunkin Donuts, where we spent $20 on six donuts(!), we hit the road.

Iceland is the kind of place that makes you feel small, like really small. Whether you’re driving through the valleys between vast fields and mountain ranges, or walking along paths next to glacially charged rivers and waterfalls. Everything is huge.

Pingvellir was our first stop along Ring Road. This is the location where the European plate is diverging from the North American plate. The rift in the Earth is now huge and beautiful to hike. We started our hike with 25 mph winds and 55 degree temperatures, this sent us right back to the car to add more layers just to finish our hike sweating when the wind died down.

Our next stop was to check out the Strokkur Geyser. I think the thing that awed us the most about this was that this series of geysers and hot springs were located right next to the main road, so close that I saw the first burst of water as we were pulling into the parking lot.

On our drive to the next location we passed the perfect pull off o the side of the road. Right next to a pasture full of friendly Icelandic horses. I say passed, but you know we wouldn’t have actually passed up this opportunity to get up close and personal with these beautiful creatures.

Gulfoss was the next location on our tour of Iceland. This was the biggest waterfall I have ever seen. The wind had picked up again and I’m not sure if it had started to rain or if the wind was blowing drops of water from the waterfall towards us – maybe both.

Our next stop was Skogafoss, these were our two stops that had the greatest distance between them and the sky decided to let loose during our drive. I won’t complain because we had spent hours at different locations without it raining yet – though I wasn’t the one who had to drive through it.

Just as we were approaching a giant plateau the sky cleared up and we both were amazed at this huge waterfall falling from the rocks in front of us. The road didn’t appear to get close to it so a mental image was going to have to do. It was so windy that the smaller waterfalls next to it were blowing away and evaporating before the water could hit the ground, which shows just how big and powerful this one waterfall was in comparison.

There was a small gravel road that lead to the base of this waterfall, so we made a quick detour to Seljandsfoss. There was a path that lead us behind the waterfall and I got my kiss behind a waterfall. (The #3 most romantic thing to do in Iceland according to a book we found in a gift shop, FYI.)

And then we moved on to Skogafoss, where we didn’t hike around or behind the waterfall, instead we climbed 600 stairs to the top. If we had kept hiking we would have made it to the Eyjafjallajokull glacier – after a day or so.

Our next stop was Vik and although we felt tired and it was already after 8 p.m. it looked like noon and we had no desire to stop. The plan was to get dinner in Vik but we got there after 9 and everything was already closed so we enjoyed a cup of soup heated in the one gas station in town.

Instead of hanging around Vik where the fog was too thick to see a mile in front of you we drove back and parked our car at the the base of the glacier we saw earlier and tried to sleep to the sound of pouring rain on the roof of the car as the temperature dropped.

Around 5 a.m.we decided sleep was pointless and went to hike the glacier. Literally, past the warning signs and onto the glacier itself. I was scared for my life but couldn’t be the only one to not do it.

On our way back to Reykjavik we made a quick pitstop to check out the volcanic crater in Selfoss. Back in Reykjavik we had a couple hours to check out the Harpa Concert Hall, a history museum, and grab lunch before our flight home.

We reached the end of a fairytale, and it was time to go back to reality. Happily ever after?

 

“Not all fairytales have a happy beginning, but they always have a happy ending.” JM

Part 4 – I’m the Queen of the Castle and He’s the Dirty Rascal

Finally an early morning in Amsterdam. For me at least – I had to drag John out of bed, but I didn’t care because the one thing on top of my Amsterdam Bucket List was to go see a real life fairytale…. sorta.

I wanted to visit a castle and Kasteel de Haar was my dream come true; surrounded by a moat, flower gardens, and even a maze, it had everything.

It took us two trains and a bus to get there just to find out the castle was closed for a private event. Fortunately, the grounds were open and it still took us over an hour to see about two-thirds of it.

It was vast and amazing, with green everywhere you looked dotted with pink and purple flowers. There were swans roaming around the different bodies of waters and if we had had more time we could have wandered down to their deer pasture.

As predicted, I fell in love with the place and for the first time on this trip, took hundreds of pictures. If I had actually been let into the castle I’m not sure if I would have ever left.

Before heading back into Amsterdam we spent a couple of hours in Utrecht. The first hour was spent searching for the “perfect” pizza place – only one owned and operated by Italians would satisfy John’s taste buds at this moment.

After pizza and gelato we explored the St. Martin’s Cathedral – originally built and designed by Catholics and destroyed during the Reformation in 1580. Catholic symbols were literally chiseled off the walls, making this an interesting place to visit.

The other thing that makes this place so interesting is that the entire central hall collapsed in 1674 and was never rebuilt. There is now an open air courtyard between the tower and the main building – you can visit both sections separately.

I guess we saved the best for last because this was my favorite day spent in Holland and after arriving back in Amsterdam we only had time to grab our luggage from the hotel before heading to the airport to catch our flight to Iceland!

Part 3 – The Typical Touristy Stuff

June 30th-

Finally, after being in the country for 3 days already we took a day to be actual tourists.

Even though waking up was a burden, either because the jet lag finally hit home or all the Heinekens did. My vote is for the Heinekens so what better place to start our day than the Heineken Experience? Yay, more beer!

But first chicken wings – yes, for breakfast because vacation. (and it was already noon.)

The history of the Heineken brewery is predictable. Rich kid invests family fortune on a brewery and proceeds to make family fortune bigger.

The whole thing was interactive and of course included several beers – definitely a must see in Amsterdam.

We then took the risk of attempting the Anne Frank House. Unfortunately, the only thing this mission was good for was the exercise because that hour long line was just not going to happen for us.

Our next stop on the list was courtesy of our bartender from the night before. Europe’s highest swing on top of the A’dam Building. It’s located right across the canal from Central Station and you can take a free ferry over. The tower also happens to be the second tallest building in Amsterdam so you get the best view over looking the city.

On the floor below the swing is a 360 interactive observatory. Being able to see the sites and ‘click’ on the locations to read about it in real time is awesome.

After dinner there was one more museum I had to make time for, this one brought us back to the Red Light District. The Museum of Prostitution features a red window tucked right in with all the others and is actually a room where a prostitute got murdered a while back. The museum had some fun facts about the different types of legal prostitution around Amsterdam and a confession wall where visitors can display their dirty secrets as well.

We woke up tired and spent the entire day walking back and forth across the city, I don’t think either one of us even considered staying out that night. It was an early bedtime to get ready for what was going to be my favorite day in Amsterdam.

Zandvoort – Part 2

After an early night – I say early but I think we were up until 3 a.m. eating candy in bed and laughing at ourselves- and a not so early morning (oops) we planned on spending the day outside of the city.

It was 80 degrees and sunny and perfect for a trip to the beach.

The twenty minute trein ride to Zandvoort was scenic but uneventful – although it did spark a conversation about possibly hitching a ride to Paris later in the week. It was also cool to get out of the city and see some of the more ‘country’ parts of the Netherlands.

There were villages that looked exactly like how you would picture a quaint Dutch town to be. Old Dutch houses alongside small canals, horses and sheep grazing around huge green fields and even a couple old school windmills.

Our day was full of tanning, beer, and fried goat cheese. The croquettes were John’s idea- we just had to try some traditional Dutch food- but I knew it sounded bad when the guy said they take whatever they have in the kitchen and fry it. I’m honestly still not exactly sure what we were eating but the restaurant was an Indian-ish style, beach side bar. I wish I had taken a picture of it without me in it.

The thunder and pouring rain when we go back into the city brought our plans of a fun night out to a stop. Fortunately, John and I can have fun together regardless and we enjoyed our night hiding from the rain at the various pubs in the square right behind our hotel.

We even got some local tips from a friendly Irish bartender we met that we added to our agenda for the next day. I’m still disappointed at my lack of picture taking, though.